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10.a.1 Proportion of Tariff Lines Applied to Imports with Zero Tariff (All Products)

Target 10.a: Implement the principle of special and differential treatment for developing countries, in particular least developed countries, in accordance with World Trade Organization agreements

Goal 10: Reduce inequality within and among countries

Custodian Organization: International Trade Centre (ITC), United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) and The World Trade Organization (WTO)

Tier Classification: Tier I

To facilitate the implementation of the global indicator framework, all indicators are classified by the IAEG-SDGs (Inter-Agency and Expert Group on Sustainable Development Goals Indicators) into three tiers on the basis of their level of methodological development and the availability of data at the global level, as follows:

Tier I: Indicator is conceptually clear, has an internationally established methodology and standards are available, and data are regularly produced by countries for at least 50 per cent of countries and of the population in every region where the indicator is relevant.

Tier II: Indicator is conceptually clear, has an internationally established methodology and standards are available, but data are not regularly produced by countries.

Tier III: No internationally established methodology or standards are yet available for the indicator, but methodology/standards are being (or will be) developed or tested.

Source: United Nations Statistical Division

Definition: Proportion of total number of tariff lines (in per cent) applied to products imported from least developed countries and developing countries corresponding to a 0% tariff rate in HS chapter 01-97.

Rationale: The calculation of this indicator will allow observing on how many products Developing countries and LDCs will have free access to Developed countries markets. When compared to the tariff rates applied to other countries, this indicator will allow assessing to which extent special and differential treatment has been accorded in terms of import tariffs. The evolution of this indicator will indicate progress on the phasing out of tariff rates on goods coming from Developing and LDCs.

Concepts:

Tariff line or National Tariff lines (NTL): National Tariff Line codes refer to the classification codes, applied to merchandise goods by individual countries, that are longer than the HS six digit level. Countries are free to introduce national distinctions for tariffs and many other purposes. The national tariff line codes are based on the HS system but are longer than six digits. For example, the six digit HS code 010120 refers to Asses, mules and hinnies, live, whereas the US National Tariff line code 010120.10 refers to live purebred breeding asses, 010120.20 refers to live asses other than purebred breeding asses and 010120.30 refers to mules and hinnies imported for immediate slaughter.

Tariffs: Tariffs are customs duties on merchandise imports, levied either on an ad valorem basis (percentage of value) or on a specific basis (e.g. $7 per 100 kg). Tariffs can be used to create a price advantage for similar locally-produced goods and for raising government revenues. Trade remedy measures and taxes are not considered to be tariffs.

Comments and limitations: “The following caveats should be taken in consideration while reviewing this indicator: Accurate estimates on special and differential treatment for developing countries do not exist, thus the calculations are limited to tariffs only. These are only part of the trade limitation factors, especially when looking at exports of developing or least developed countries under non-reciprocal preferential treatment that set criteria for eligibility.

A full coverage of preferential schemes of developed countries are used for the computation, but preferential treatment may not be fully used by developing countries’ exporters for different reasons such as the inability of certain exporters to meet eligibility criteria (i.e., complying with rules of origin). As there is no accurate statistical information on the extent of the actual utilization of each of these preferences, it is assumed that they are fully utilized.

Duty free treatment is an indicator of market access, but is not always synonymous with preferential treatment for beneficiary countries, because a number of MFN tariffs are already at, or close to, zero, especially for fuels and minerals. International agreements on IT products also offer duty-free treatment for components and equipment used for production purpose”

Source: United Nations Statistical Division

Data Source: Data for this indicator was primarily collected from the United Nations Statistics Division’s Open SDG Data Hub. National level data is provided to the United Nations Statistics Division by the respective nation, unless otherwise noted. To learn more about the data used in this portal, visit the about page.

Data is accurate as of January 17, 2020

 

10.a.1 Proportion of Tariff Lines Applied to Imports with Zero Tariff (All Products)

 
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10.a.1 Proportion of Tariff Lines Applied to Imports with Zero Tariff (All Products) Sustainable Development Goals

10. Reduce inequality within and among countries
10. Reduce inequality within and among countries

10. Reduce inequality within and among countries

The international community has made significant strides towards lifting people out of poverty. The most vulnerable nations – the least developed countries, the landlocked developing countries and the small island developing states – continue to make inroads into poverty reduction. However, inequality still persists and large disparities remain in access to health and education services and other assets.

Additionally, while income inequality between countries may have been reduced, inequality within countries has risen. There is growing consensus that economic growth is not sufficient to reduce poverty if it is not inclusive and if it does not involve the three dimensions of sustainable development – economic, social and environmental.

To reduce inequality, policies should be universal in principle paying attention to the needs of disadvantaged and marginalized populations.

Related 10.a.1 Proportion of Tariff Lines Applied to Imports with Zero Tariff (All Products) Targets

10.a
Implement the principle of special and differential treatment for developing countries, in particular least developed countries, in accordance with World Trade Organization agreements