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12.4.1 Compliance with the Basel Convention on Hazardous Waste and Other Chemicals

Target 12.4: By 2020, achieve the environmentally sound management of chemicals and all wastes throughout their life cycle, in accordance with agreed international frameworks, and significantly reduce their release to air, water and soil in order to minimize their adverse impacts on human health and the environment

Goal 12: Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns

Custodian Organization: UN Environment (United Nations Environment Programme)

Tier Classification: Tier I

To facilitate the implementation of the global indicator framework, all indicators are classified by the IAEG-SDGs (Inter-Agency and Expert Group on Sustainable Development Goals Indicators) into three tiers on the basis of their level of methodological development and the availability of data at the global level, as follows:

Tier I: Indicator is conceptually clear, has an internationally established methodology and standards are available, and data are regularly produced by countries for at least 50 per cent of countries and of the population in every region where the indicator is relevant.

Tier II: Indicator is conceptually clear, has an internationally established methodology and standards are available, but data are not regularly produced by countries.

Tier III: No internationally established methodology or standards are yet available for the indicator, but methodology/standards are being (or will be) developed or tested.

Source: United Nations Statistical Division

Definition: The indicator refers to the number of parties (countries) that have ratified, accepted, approved or accessed) to the Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal.

The information required for the Basel Convention is as follows:

1. Designation of the Focal Point and one or more Competent Authorities; and
2. Submission of the annual national reports.

Rationale:The proposed indicator is process-oriented, focusing on compliance with the obligations that contribute to the overall target of achieving the environmentally sound management of chemicals and all wastes throughout their life cycle.

It doesn’t measure the quantity of chemicals in media and doesn’t quantify adverse impacts on human health and the environment. The MEAs, however, were developed and adopted to address the most urgent challenges for human health and the environment and therefore, through the implementation of MEAs progress will be made to reduce release to air, water and soil and well as presence of hazardous chemicals in products.

Limitations:The transmission of information as required by the five Conventions follows a different timing. This is the reason why the reporting to this indicator has been scheduled for 5-year cycles, which would allow capturing the compliance of Parties with the transmission of information of all the Conventions.

Please also note that the timing for submission of reporting for the Minamata Convention has not yet been agreed on. It is not clear whether any reporting will be required prior to 2020, nor it is clear how many times reporting would be required prior to 2030. Thus, the Minamata Convention is included here, but the reporting is subject to further decisions on this.

Source: United Nations Statistical Division

Data Source: Data for this indicator was primarily collected from the United Nations Statistics Division’s Open SDG Data Hub. National level data from the UN Statistics Division is compiled by the respective custodian for the SDG indicator, unless otherwise noted. To learn more about the data used in this portal, visit the about page.

Data is accurate as of October 31, 2018.

 
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12.4.1 Compliance with the Basel Convention on Hazardous Waste and Other Chemicals in the Sustainable Development Goals

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12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns
12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns

12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns

Sustainable consumption and production is about promoting resource and energy efficiency, sustainable infrastructure, and providing access to basic services, green and decent jobs and a better quality of life for all. Its implementation helps to achieve overall development plans, reduce future economic, environmental and social costs, strengthen economic competitiveness and reduce poverty.

Sustainable consumption and production aims at “doing more and better with less,” increasing net welfare gains from economic activities by reducing resource use, degradation and pollution along the whole lifecycle, while increasing quality of life. It involves different stakeholders, including business, consumers, policy makers, researchers, scientists, retailers, media, and development cooperation agencies, among others.

It also requires a systemic approach and cooperation among actors operating in the supply chain, from producer to final consumer. It involves engaging consumers through awareness-raising and education on sustainable consumption and lifestyles, providing consumers with adequate information through standards and labels and engaging in sustainable public procurement, among others.

Related 12.4.1 Compliance with the Basel Convention on Hazardous Waste and Other Chemicals Targets

12.4

By 2020, achieve the environmentally sound management of chemicals and all wastes throughout their life cycle, in accordance with agreed international frameworks, and significantly reduce their release to air, water and soil in order to minimize their adverse impacts on human health and the environment