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13.1.3 Proportion of Local Governments that Adopt and Implement Local Disaster Risk Reduction Strategies

Target 13.1: Strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters in all countries

Goal 13: Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts

Custodian Organization: International Trade Centre (ITC), United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) and The World Trade Organization (WTO)

Tier Classification: Tier II

To facilitate the implementation of the global indicator framework, all indicators are classified by the IAEG-SDGs (Inter-Agency and Expert Group on Sustainable Development Goals Indicators) into three tiers on the basis of their level of methodological development and the availability of data at the global level, as follows:

Tier I: Indicator is conceptually clear, has an internationally established methodology and standards are available, and data are regularly produced by countries for at least 50 per cent of countries and of the population in every region where the indicator is relevant.

Tier II: Indicator is conceptually clear, has an internationally established methodology and standards are available, but data are not regularly produced by countries.

Tier III: No internationally established methodology or standards are yet available for the indicator, but methodology/standards are being (or will be) developed or tested.

Source: United Nations Statistical Division

Definition: The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 was adopted by UN Member States in March 2015 as a global policy of disaster risk reduction. One of the targets is: “Substantially increase the number of countries with national and local disaster risk reduction strategies by 2020”. In line with the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030, disaster risk reduction strategies and policies should mainstream and integrate disaster risk reduction within and across all sectors, across different timescales and with targets, indicators and time frames. These strategies should be aimed at preventing the creation of disaster risk, the reduction of existing risk and the strengthening of economic, social, health and environmental resilience.

The open-ended intergovernmental expert working group on indicators and terminology relating to disaster risk reduction (OIEWG) established by the General Assembly (resolution 69/284) has developed a set of indicators to measure global progress in the implementation of the Sendai Framework, which was endorsed by the UNGA (OIEWG report A/71/644). The relevant SDG indicators reflect the Sendai Framework indicators.

Rationale: Increasing the proportion of local governments that adopt and implement local disaster risk reduction strategies, which the Sendai Framework calls for, will contribute to sustainable development and strengthen economic, social, health and environmental resilience. Their economic, environmental and social perspectives would include poverty eradication, urban resilience, and climate change adaptation.

Comments and limitations: The Hyogo Framework for Action Monitor (HFA Monitor) started in 2007 and over time, the number of countries reporting to UNISDR increased from 60 in 2007 to approximately 100 countries in 2015 undertaking voluntary self-assessment of progress in implementing the HFA. During the four reporting cycles the HFA Monitor has generated the world’s largest repository of information on national disaster risk reduction policy inter alia. In 2018 the Sendai Framework Monitor system will launch and all Member States are expected to report data of the previous year(s).

Source: United Nations Statistical Division

Data Source: Data for this indicator was primarily collected from the United Nations Statistics Division’s Open SDG Data Hub. National level data is provided to the United Nations Statistics Division by the respective nation, unless otherwise noted. To learn more about the data used in this portal, visit the about page.

Data is accurate as of January 17, 2020

 
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13.1.3 Proportion of Local Governments that Adopt and Implement Local Disaster Risk Reduction Strategies in the Sustainable Development Goals

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13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts
13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts

13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts

Climate change is now affecting every country on every continent. It is disrupting national economies and affecting lives, costing people, communities and countries dearly today and even more tomorrow.

People are experiencing the significant impacts of climate change, which include changing weather patterns, rising sea level, and more extreme weather events. The greenhouse gas emissions from human activities are driving climate change and continue to rise. They are now at their highest levels in history. Without action, the world’s average surface temperature is projected to rise over the 21st century and is likely to surpass 3 degrees Celsius this century—with some areas of the world expected to warm even more. The poorest and most vulnerable people are being affected the most.

Affordable, scalable solutions are now available to enable countries to leapfrog to cleaner, more resilient economies. The pace of change is quickening as more people are turning to renewable energy and a range of other measures that will reduce emissions and increase adaptation efforts.

But climate change is a global challenge that does not respect national borders. Emissions anywhere affect people everywhere. It is an issue that requires solutions that need to be coordinated at the international level and it requires international cooperation to help developing countries move toward a low-carbon economy.

To address climate change, countries adopted the Paris Agreement at the COP21 in Paris on 12 December 2015. The Agreement entered into force shortly thereafter, on 4 November 2016. In the agreement, all countries agreed to work to limit global temperature rise to well below 2 degrees Celsius, and given the grave risks, to strive for 1.5 degrees Celsius. You can learn more about the agreement here.

Implementation of the Paris Agreement is essential for the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals, and provides a roadmap for climate actions that will reduce emissions and build climate resilience.

See which countries have signed it and which ones have deposited their ratification instruments.

Related 13.1.3 Proportion of Local Governments that Adopt and Implement Local Disaster Risk Reduction Strategies Targets

13.1

Strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters in all countries