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2.5.2 Proportion of Local Breeds Classified as Being at Unknown Risk of Extinction

Target 2.5: By 2020, maintain the genetic diversity of seeds, cultivated plants and farmed and domesticated animals and their related wild species, including through soundly managed and diversified seed and plant banks at the national, regional and international levels, and promote access to and fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from the utilization of genetic resources and associated traditional knowledge, as internationally agreed

Goal 2: End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture

Custodian Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

Tier Classification: Tier I

To facilitate the implementation of the global indicator framework, all indicators are classified by the IAEG-SDGs (Inter-Agency and Expert Group on Sustainable Development Goals Indicators) into three tiers on the basis of their level of methodological development and the availability of data at the global level, as follows:

Tier I: Indicator is conceptually clear, has an internationally established methodology and standards are available, and data are regularly produced by countries for at least 50 per cent of countries and of the population in every region where the indicator is relevant.

Tier II: Indicator is conceptually clear, has an internationally established methodology and standards are available, but data are not regularly produced by countries.

Tier III: No internationally established methodology or standards are yet available for the indicator, but methodology/standards are being (or will be) developed or tested.

Source: United Nations Statistical Division

Definition: The indicator presents the percentage of livestock breeds classified as being at risk, not at risk or of unknown risk of extinctions at a certain moment in time, as well as the trends for those percentages.

Concepts: This indicator was originally proposed for the Target 15.5, and it serves also as an indicator for the Aichi Target 13 “Genetic Diversity of Terrestrial Domesticated Animals” under the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). It is described on the webpage of the Biodiversity Indicators Partnership (BIP), a network of organizations, which have come together to provide the most up-to date biodiversity information possible for tracking progress towards the Aichi Targets. Further, it is presented in the Global Biodiversity Outlook 4, page 91 which is an output of the processes under the CBD.

Rationale: The indicator has a direct link to “biodiversity” as animal or livestock genetic resources represent an integral part of agricultural ecosystems and biodiversity as such. Further there are indirect links to “malnutrition”: Animal genetic resources for food and agriculture are an essential part of the biological basis for world food security, and contribute to the livelihoods of over a thousand million people. A diverse resource base is critical for human survival and well-being, and a contribution to the eradication of hunger: animal genetic resources are crucial in adapting to changing socio-economic and environmental conditions, including climate change. They are the animal breeder’s raw material and amongst the farmer’s most essential inputs. They are essential for sustainable agricultural production.
No increase of the percentage of breeds being at risk or being extinct is directly related to “halt the loss of biodiversity”.

Limitations: Breed-related information remains far from complete. For almost 60 percent of all reported breeds, risk status is not known because of missing population data or lack of recent updates.
Generally, data collection should be possible in all countries. Updating of population size data at least each 10 years is needed for the definition of the risk classes.

Source: United Nations Statistical Division

Data Source: Data for this indicator was primarily collected from the United Nations Statistics Division’s Open SDG Data Hub. National level data from the UN Statistics Division is compiled by the respective custodian for the SDG indicator, unless otherwise noted. To learn more about the data used in this portal, visit the about page.

Data is accurate as of January, 2019.

 
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2.5.2 Proportion of Local Breeds Classified as Being at Unknown Risk of Extinction Sustainable Development Goals

2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture

2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture

It is time to rethink how we grow, share and consume our food.

If done right, agriculture, forestry and fisheries can provide nutritious food for all and generate decent incomes, while supporting people-centred rural development and protecting the environment.

Right now, our soils, freshwater, oceans, forests and biodiversity are being rapidly degraded. Climate change is putting even more pressure on the resources we depend on, increasing risks associated with disasters such as droughts and floods. Many rural women and men can no longer make ends meet on their land, forcing them to migrate to cities in search of opportunities.

A profound change of the global food and agriculture system is needed if we are to nourish today’s 815 million hungry and the additional 2 billion people expected by 2050.

The food and agriculture sector offers key solutions for development, and is central for hunger and poverty eradication.

Related 2.5.2 Proportion of Local Breeds Classified as Being at Unknown Risk of ExtinctionTargets

2.5

By 2020, maintain the genetic diversity of seeds, cultivated plants and farmed and domesticated animals and their related wild species, including through soundly managed and diversified seed and plant banks at the national, regional and international levels, and promote access to and fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from the utilization of genetic resources and associated traditional knowledge, as internationally agreed