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4.4.1 Proportion of Youths and Adults with Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Skills (Copy and Paste Skills)

Target 4.4: By 2030, substantially increase the number of youth and adults who have relevant skills, including technical and vocational skills, for employment, decent jobs and entrepreneurship

Goal 4: Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all

Custodian Organization: UNESCO Institute for Statistics (UNESCO-UIS)

Tier Classification: Tier II

To facilitate the implementation of the global indicator framework, all indicators are classified by the IAEG-SDGs (Inter-Agency and Expert Group on Sustainable Development Goals Indicators) into three tiers on the basis of their level of methodological development and the availability of data at the global level, as follows:

Tier I: Indicator is conceptually clear, has an internationally established methodology and standards are available, and data are regularly produced by countries for at least 50 per cent of countries and of the population in every region where the indicator is relevant.

Tier II: Indicator is conceptually clear, has an internationally established methodology and standards are available, but data are not regularly produced by countries.

Tier III: No internationally established methodology or standards are yet available for the indicator, but methodology/standards are being (or will be) developed or tested.

Source: United Nations Statistical Division

Definition: The proportion of youth and adults with information and communications technology (ICT) skills, by type of skill as defined as the percentage of youth (aged 15-24 years) and adults (aged 15 years and above) that have undertaken certain computer-related activities in a given time period (e.g. last three months). This data portrayed for this indicator looks specifically at the proportion of youths and adults able to using copy and paste tools to duplicate or move information within a document.

Rationale: ICT skills determine the effective use of information and communication technology. The lack of such skills continues to be one of the key barriers keeping people, and in particular women, from fully benefiting from the potential of information and communication technologies.

Limitations: This indicator is relatively new but based on an internationally-agreed definition and methodology, which have been developed under the coordination of International Telecommunications Union (ITU), through its Expert Groups and following an extensive consultation process with countries. It is also one of the Partnerships on Measuring ICT for Development’s Core List of Indicators, which was endorsed by the UN Statistical Commission in 2014.

The indicator is based on the responses provided by interviewees regarding certain computer-related activities that they have carried out in a reference period of time. However, it is not a direct assessment of skills nor do we know if those activities were undertaken effectively.

One main issue is that the definition of IEA assessment does not include programming while ITU definition does. Although both have application meaning using computer and computer with internet connection as a tool in everyday life, IEA’s assessment of ICT skills definition is more restricted as compare to ITU’s definition. If a common framework is to be established the definition of both will need to be harmonized.

Source: United Nations Statistical Division

Data Source: Data for this indicator was primarily collected from the United Nations Statistics Division’s Open SDG Data Hub. National level data is provided to the United Nations Statistics Division by the respective geographies, unless otherwise noted. To learn more about the data used in this portal, visit the about page.

Data is accurate as of October 31, 2018.

 
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4.4.1 Proportion of Youths and Adults with Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Skills (Copy and Paste Skills) in the Sustainable Development Goals

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4. Ensure inclusive and quality education for all and promote lifelong learning
4. Ensure inclusive and quality education for all and promote lifelong learning

4. Ensure inclusive and quality education for all and promote lifelong learning

Obtaining a quality education is the foundation to improving people’s lives and sustainable development. Major progress has been made towards increasing access to education at all levels and increasing enrolment rates in schools particularly for women and girls. Basic literacy skills have improved tremendously, yet bolder efforts are needed to make even greater strides for achieving universal education goals. For example, the world has achieved equality in primary education between girls and boys, but few countries have achieved that target at all levels of education.

Related 4.4.1 Proportion of Youths and Adults with Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Skills (Copy and Paste Skills) Targets

4.4

By 2030, substantially increase the number of youth and adults who have relevant skills, including technical and vocational skills, for employment, decent jobs and entrepreneurship