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6.1.1 Proportion of Population Using Safely Managed Drinking Water Services

Target 6.1: By 2030, achieve universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water for all

Goal 6: Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all

Custodian Organization:World Health Organization (WHO) and United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF)

Tier Classification: Tier II

To facilitate the implementation of the global indicator framework, all indicators are classified by the IAEG-SDGs (Inter-Agency and Expert Group on Sustainable Development Goals Indicators) into three tiers on the basis of their level of methodological development and the availability of data at the global level, as follows:

Tier I: Indicator is conceptually clear, has an internationally established methodology and standards are available, and data are regularly produced by countries for at least 50 per cent of countries and of the population in every region where the indicator is relevant.

Tier II: Indicator is conceptually clear, has an internationally established methodology and standards are available, but data are not regularly produced by countries.

Tier III: No internationally established methodology or standards are yet available for the indicator, but methodology/standards are being (or will be) developed or tested.

Source: United Nations Statistical Division

Definition: Proportion of population using safely managed drinking water services is currently being measured by the proportion of population using an improved basic drinking water source which is located on premises, available when needed and free of faecal (and priority chemical) contamination. ‘Improved’ drinking water sources include: piped water into dwelling, yard or plot; public taps or standpipes; boreholes or tubewells; protected dug wells; protected springs; packaged water; delivered water and rainwater.

Rationale: MDG target 7C called for ‘sustainable access’ to ‘safe drinking water’. At the start of the MDG period, there was a complete lack of nationally representative data about drinking water safety in developing countries, and such data were not collected through household surveys or censuses. The JMP developed the concept of ‘improved’ water sources, which was used as a proxy for ‘safe water’, as such sources are likely to be protected against faecal contamination, and this metric has been used since 2000 to track progress towards the MDG target. International consultations since 2011 have established consensus on the need to build on and address the shortcomings of this indicator; specifically, to address normative criteria of the human right to water including accessibility, availability and quality. The above consultation concluded that JMP should go beyond the basic level of access and address safe management of drinking water services, including dimensions of accessibility, availability and quality. The proposed indicator of ‘safely managed drinking water services’ is designed to address this.

Concepts: Improved drinking water sources include the following: piped water into dwelling, yard or plot; public taps or standpipes; boreholes or tubewells; protected dug wells; protected springs; packaged water; delivered water and rainwater. A water source is considered to be ‘located on premises’ if the point of collection is within the dwelling, yard, or plot.‘Available when needed’: households are able to access sufficient quantities of water when needed. ‘Free from faecal and priority chemical contamination’: water complies with relevant national or local standards. In the absence of such standards, reference is made to the WHO Guidelines for Drinking Water Quality. E. coli or thermotolerant coliforms are the preferred indicator for microbiological quality, and arsenic and fluoride are the priority chemicals for global reporting.

Comments and limitations: Data on availability and safety of drinking water is increasingly available through a combination of household surveys and administrative sources including regulators, but definitions have yet to be standardized. Data on faecal and chemical contamination, drawn from household surveys and regulatory databases, will not cover all countries immediately. However, sufficient data were available to make global and regional estimates of safely managed drinking water services for four out of eight SDG regions in 2017.

Source: United Nations Statistical Division

Data Source: Data for this indicator was primarily collected from the United Nations Statistics Division’s Open SDG Data Hub. National level data is provided to the United Nations Statistics Division by the respective nation, unless otherwise noted. To learn more about the data used in this portal, visit the about page.

Data is accurate as of October 31, 2018.

6.1.1 Proportion of Population Using Safely Managed Drinking Water Services

 
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6.1.1 Proportion of Population Using Safely Managed Drinking Water Services Sustainable Development Goals

6. Ensure access to water and sanitation for all
6. Ensure access to water and sanitation for all

6. Ensure access to water and sanitation for all

Clean, accessible water for all is an essential part of the world we want to live in. There is sufficient fresh water on the planet to achieve this. But due to bad economics or poor infrastructure, every year millions of people, most of them children, die from diseases associated with inadequate water supply, sanitation and hygiene.

Water scarcity, poor water quality and inadequate sanitation negatively impact food security, livelihood choices and educational opportunities for poor families across the world. Drought afflicts some of the world’s poorest countries, worsening hunger and malnutrition.

By 2050, at least one in four people is likely to live in a country affected by chronic or recurring shortages of fresh water.

Related 6.1.1 Proportion of Population Using Safely Managed Drinking Water Services Targets

6.1

By 2030, achieve universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water for all