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6.3.1 Proportion of Safely Treated Domestic Wastewater Flows

Target 6.3: By 2030, improve water quality by reducing pollution, eliminating dumping and minimizing release of hazardous chemicals and materials, halving the proportion of untreated wastewater and substantially increasing recycling and safe reuse globally

Goal 6: Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all

Custodian Organization:World Health Organization (WHO) and United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT)

Tier Classification: Tier II

To facilitate the implementation of the global indicator framework, all indicators are classified by the IAEG-SDGs (Inter-Agency and Expert Group on Sustainable Development Goals Indicators) into three tiers on the basis of their level of methodological development and the availability of data at the global level, as follows:

Tier I: Indicator is conceptually clear, has an internationally established methodology and standards are available, and data are regularly produced by countries for at least 50 per cent of countries and of the population in every region where the indicator is relevant.

Tier II: Indicator is conceptually clear, has an internationally established methodology and standards are available, but data are not regularly produced by countries.

Tier III: No internationally established methodology or standards are yet available for the indicator, but methodology/standards are being (or will be) developed or tested.

Source: United Nations Statistical Division

Definition: Proportion of wastewater generated by households and by economic activities which is safely treated based on treatment ladders as defined by the SEEA, and International Recommendations for Water Statistics (IRWS), compared to total wastewater generated by households and economic activities.

This indicator covers households and the entire economy, and builds on the monitoring framework of JMP, UNSD/UNEP Water Questionnaire for non OECD/Eurostat countries, OECD/Eurostat Questionnaire for OECD countries, AQUASAT, IBNET. Statistical methods for measurement of wastewater treatment is aligned with the SEEA21 statistical standard and associated definitions, classifications and treatment categories (Encompasses all wastewater generated and treated by the economy. Treatment Categories will be consistent, as much as possible within the context of global monitoring purposes, with those defined in the SEEA and International Recommendations for Water Statistics.

In addition, combining UNIDO industries database ISIC standard Classification system, will allow for data to be disaggregated for industrial/commercial wastewater into various economic activities, as well as differentiate hazardous industries from the rest. USEPA has harmonized hazardous waste classification with EU regulations compliment ISIC codes for all waste classes.

The household portion of wastewater is the same indicator as 6.2.1, and the monitoring of that will be interlinked to JMP monitoring for 6.2.1. Over the last 25 years the JMP has established global norms and standards for monitoring drinking water, sanitation and hygiene. The proposed 6.2.1. indicator builds on these and was developed following extensive consultations with sector experts. Major international consultations took place in 2011 and 2012, as well as many regional and country consultations in various parts of the world.

Existing global norms and standards and technical recommendations for SDG monitoring are documented here.

Rationale: Purpose and rationale for this indicator can also be found in the methods document and summarized in the following methodological note (p12).

Concepts: See above. Global norms and standards and technical recommendations for SDG monitoring are documented here. System of Environmental and Economic Accounting for Water, adopted by Statistical Commission in 2014. This accounting structure means that these activities cover the whole economy and are considered for each industry, which are defined according to the International Standard Industrial Classification of all Economic Activities (ISIC), and covering 1) abstraction and distribution of water, 2) discharge, reuse and treatment of wastewater, and 3) consumption and returns of water back to the environment, in this accounting structure, disaggregated by industry in a standardized way. Economic activities by ISIC broadly covers agriculture, hazardous industries and other economic activities.

Comments and limitations: The main issue regarding safely managed drinking water services will be comparability of data on the definition of what is considered safe treatment. Although there are international guidelines and standards, their compliance by countries is not internationally binding. Countries can set their own standards which can vary from international norms and standards. For this reason, country data may not follow the international standard that JMP likes to follow for its global monitoring purposes.

Having said the above, using MDG experiences of data reconciliation, and working collaboratively with JMP on this will help reconciling definitional discrepancies and hence variations in estimates. This vast experience in dealing with such issues will be very useful in dealing with the above issues for the SDG period.

Source: United Nations Statistical Division

Data Source: Data for this indicator was primarily collected from the United Nations Statistics Division’s Open SDG Data Hub. National level data is provided to the United Nations Statistics Division by the respective nation, unless otherwise noted. To learn more about the data used in this portal, visit the about page.

Data is accurate as of January 17, 2020

 

 
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6.3.1 Proportion of Safely Treated Domestic Wastewater Flows in the Sustainable Development Goals

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6. Ensure access to water and sanitation for all
6. Ensure access to water and sanitation for all

6. Ensure access to water and sanitation for all

Clean, accessible water for all is an essential part of the world we want to live in. There is sufficient fresh water on the planet to achieve this. But due to bad economics or poor infrastructure, every year millions of people, most of them children, die from diseases associated with inadequate water supply, sanitation and hygiene.

Water scarcity, poor water quality and inadequate sanitation negatively impact food security, livelihood choices and educational opportunities for poor families across the world. Drought afflicts some of the world’s poorest countries, worsening hunger and malnutrition.

By 2050, at least one in four people is likely to live in a country affected by chronic or recurring shortages of fresh water.

Related 6.3.1 Proportion of Safely Treated Domestic Wastewater Flows Targets

6.3

By 2030, improve water quality by reducing pollution, eliminating dumping and minimizing release of hazardous chemicals and materials, halving the proportion of untreated wastewater and substantially increasing recycling and safe reuse globally