Description
Maps
SDGs
Select Year Range:

6.4.1 Water Use Efficiency (USD Per Cubic Meter)

Target 6.4: By 2030, substantially increase water-use efficiency across all sectors and ensure sustainable withdrawals and supply of freshwater to address water scarcity and substantially reduce the number of people suffering from water scarcity

Goal 6: Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all

Custodian Organization:Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

Tier Classification: Tier I

To facilitate the implementation of the global indicator framework, all indicators are classified by the IAEG-SDGs (Inter-Agency and Expert Group on Sustainable Development Goals Indicators) into three tiers on the basis of their level of methodological development and the availability of data at the global level, as follows:

Tier I: Indicator is conceptually clear, has an internationally established methodology and standards are available, and data are regularly produced by countries for at least 50 per cent of countries and of the population in every region where the indicator is relevant.

Tier II: Indicator is conceptually clear, has an internationally established methodology and standards are available, but data are not regularly produced by countries.

Tier III: No internationally established methodology or standards are yet available for the indicator, but methodology/standards are being (or will be) developed or tested.

Source: United Nations Statistical Division

Definition: The change in water use efficiency over time (CWUE). The change in the ratio of the value added to the volume of water use, over time. Water Use Efficiency (WUE) is defined as the value added of a given major sector divided by the volume of water used. Following ISIC 4 coding, sectors are defined as:

1. agriculture; forestry; fishing (ISIC A), hereinafter “agriculture”;
2. mining and quarrying; manufacturing; electricity, gas, steam and air conditioning supply; constructions (ISIC B, C, D and F), hereinafter “MIMEC”;
3. all the service sectors (ISIC E and ISIC G-T), hereinafter “services”.

The unit of the indicator is expressed in Value/Volume, commonly USD/m3.

Rationale: The rationale behind this indicator consists in providing information on the efficiency of the economic and social usage of water resources, i.e. value added generated by the use of water in the main sectors of the economy, and distribution network losses.

The distribution efficiency of water systems is implicit within the calculations and could be made explicit if needed and where data are available.

This indicator addresses specifically the target component “substantially increase water-use efficiency across all sectors”, by measuring the output per unit of water from productive uses of water as well as losses in municipal water use. It does not aim at giving an exhaustive picture of the water utilization in a country. Other indicators, specifically those for Targets 1.1, 1.2, 2.1, 2.2, 5.4, 5.a, 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, 6.5 will complement the information provided by this indicator. In particular, the indicator needs to be combined with the water stress indicator 6.4.2 to provide adequate follow-up of the target 6.4.

Together, the three sectoral efficiencies provide a measure of overall water efficiency in a country. The indicator provides incentives to improve water use efficiency through all sectors, highlighting those sectors where water use efficiency is lagging behind.

The interpretation of the indicator would be enhanced by the utilization of supplementary indicators to be used at country level. Particularly important in this sense would be the indicator on efficiency of water for energy and the indicator on the efficiency of the municipality distribution networks.

Concepts:

Water use: water that is received by an industry or households from another industry or is directly abstracted. [SEEA-Water (ST/ESA/STAT/SER.F/100), par. 2.21]

Water abstraction: water removed from the environment by the economy.

Water use for irrigation (km³/year): Annual quantity of water used for irrigation purposes. It includes water from renewable freshwater resources, as well as water from over-abstraction of renewable groundwater or abstraction of fossil groundwater, direct use of agricultural drainage water, (treated) wastewater, and desalinated water.

Water use for livestock (watering and cleaning) (km³/year): Annual quantity of water used for livestock purposes. It includes water from renewable freshwater resources, as well as water from over-abstraction of renewable groundwater or abstraction of fossil groundwater, direct use of agricultural drainage water, (treated) wastewater, and desalinated water. It includes livestock watering, sanitation, cleaning of stables, etc. If connected to the public water supply network, water used for livestock is included in the services water use.

Water use for aquaculture (km³/year): Annual quantity of water used for aquaculture. It includes water from renewable freshwater resources, as well as water from over-abstraction of renewable groundwater or abstraction of fossil groundwater, direct use of agricultural drainage water, (treated) wastewater, and desalinated water. Aquaculture is the farming of aquatic organisms in inland and coastal areas, involving intervention in the rearing process to enhance production and the individual or corporate ownership of the stock being cultivated.

Water use for the MIMEC sectors (km³/year): Annual quantity of water used for the MIMEC sector. It includes water from renewable freshwater resources, as well as over-abstraction of renewable groundwater or abstraction of fossil groundwater and use of desalinated water or direct use of (treated) wastewater. This sector refers to self-supplied industries not connected to the public distribution network. *To be noted that in AQUASTAT, the sectors included in the MIMEC group are referred to as “industry”

Water use for the services sectors (km³/year) : Annual quantity of water used primarily for the direct use by the population. It includes water from renewable freshwater resources, as well as over-abstraction of renewable groundwater or abstraction of fossil groundwater and the use of desalinated water or direct use of treated wastewater. It is usually computed as the total water used by the public distribution network. It can include that part of the industries, which is connected to the municipal network.

Value added (gross): Value added is the net output of a sector after adding up all outputs and subtracting intermediate inputs. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or depletion and degradation of natural resources. The industrial origin of value added is determined by the International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC), revision 4. [WB Databank, metadata glossary, modified]

Arable land: Arable land is the land under temporary agricultural crops (multiple-cropped areas are counted only once), temporary meadows for mowing or pasture, land under market and kitchen gardens and land temporarily fallow (less than five years). The abandoned land resulting from shifting cultivation is not included in this category. Data for “Arable land” are not meant to indicate the amount of land that is potentially cultivable.

Permanent crops: Permanent crops are the land cultivated with long-term crops which do not have to be replanted for several years (such as cocoa and coffee); land under trees and shrubs producing flowers, such as roses and jasmine; and nurseries (except those for forest trees, which should be classified under “forest”). Permanent meadows and pastures are excluded from land under permanent crops.

Proportion of irrigated land on the total cultivated land: Part of cultivated land that is equipped for irrigation, expressed in percentage

Comments and limitations: The corrective coefficient Cr for the agricultural sector is needed in order to focus the indicator on the irrigated production. This is done for two main reasons:

  • To ensure that only runoff water and groundwater (so-called blue water) are considered in computing the indicator;
  • To eliminate a potential bias of the indicators, which otherwise would tend to decrease if rainfed cropland is converted to irrigated.

Source: United Nations Statistical Division

Data Source: Data for this indicator was primarily collected from the United Nations Statistics Division’s Open SDG Data Hub. National level data is provided to the United Nations Statistics Division by the respective nation, unless otherwise noted. To learn more about the data used in this portal, visit the about page.

Data is accurate as of January 17, 2020

 

6.4.1 Water Use Efficiency (USD Per Cubic Meter)

 
Loading

6.4.1 Water Use Efficiency (USD Per Cubic Meter) Sustainable Development Goals

6. Ensure access to water and sanitation for all
6. Ensure access to water and sanitation for all

6. Ensure access to water and sanitation for all

Clean, accessible water for all is an essential part of the world we want to live in. There is sufficient fresh water on the planet to achieve this. But due to bad economics or poor infrastructure, every year millions of people, most of them children, die from diseases associated with inadequate water supply, sanitation and hygiene.

Water scarcity, poor water quality and inadequate sanitation negatively impact food security, livelihood choices and educational opportunities for poor families across the world. Drought afflicts some of the world’s poorest countries, worsening hunger and malnutrition.

By 2050, at least one in four people is likely to live in a country affected by chronic or recurring shortages of fresh water.

Related 6.4.1 Water Use Efficiency (USD Per Cubic Meter) Targets

6.4

By 2030, substantially increase water-use efficiency across all sectors and ensure sustainable withdrawals and supply of freshwater to address water scarcity and substantially reduce the number of people suffering from water scarcity