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8.6.1 Youth not in Education, Employment or Training (NEET)

Target 8.6: By 2020, substantially reduce the proportion of youth not in employment, education or training

Goal 8: Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all

Custodian Organization: International Labor Organization (ILO)

Tier Classification: Tier I

To facilitate the implementation of the global indicator framework, all indicators are classified by the IAEG-SDGs (Inter-Agency and Expert Group on Sustainable Development Goals Indicators) into three tiers on the basis of their level of methodological development and the availability of data at the global level, as follows:

Tier I: Indicator is conceptually clear, has an internationally established methodology and standards are available, and data are regularly produced by countries for at least 50 per cent of countries and of the population in every region where the indicator is relevant.

Tier II: Indicator is conceptually clear, has an internationally established methodology and standards are available, but data are not regularly produced by countries.

Tier III: No internationally established methodology or standards are yet available for the indicator, but methodology/standards are being (or will be) developed or tested.

Source: United Nations Statistical Division

Definition: This indicator conveys the proportion of youth (aged 15-24 years) not in education, employment or training (also known as “the youth NEET rate”).

Concepts: For the purposes of this indicator, youth is defined as all persons between the ages of 15 and 24 (inclusive).

According to the International Standard Classification of Education (ISCED), education is defined as organized and sustained communication designed to bring about learning. Formal education is defined in ISCED as education that is institutionalized, intentional, and planned through public organizations and recognized private bodies and, in their totality, make up the formal education system of a country. Non-formal education, like formal education is defined in ISCED as education that is institutionalized, intentional and planned by an education provider but is considered an addition, alternative and/or a complement to formal education. It may be short in duration and/or low in intensity and it is typically provided in the form of short courses, workshops or seminars. Informal learning is defined in ISCED as forms of learning that are intentional or deliberate, but not institutionalized. It is thus less organized and less structured than either formal or non-formal education. Informal learning may include learning activities that occur in the family, in the work place, in the local community, and in daily life, on a self- directed, family-directed or socially-directed basis. For the purposes of this indicator, persons will be considered in education if they are in formal or non-formal education, as described above, but excluding informal learning.

Persons in employment are defined as all those who, during a short reference period, such as one week or one day, performed work for others in exchange for pay or profit.

For the purposes of this indicator, persons are considered to be in training if they are in a non-academic learning activity through which they acquire specific skills intended for vocational or technical jobs. Vocational training prepares trainees for jobs that are based on manual or practical activities, and for skilled operative jobs, both blue and white collar related to a specific trade, occupation or vocation. Technical training on the other hand imparts learning that can be applied in intermediate-level jobs, in particular those of technicians and middle managers. The coverage of vocational and technical training includes only programmes that are solely school-based vocational and technical training. Employer-based training is, by definition, excluded from the scope of this indicator.

Rationale: The share of youth not in employment, education or training (youth NEET rate) provides a measure of youth who are outside the educational system, not in training and not in employment, and thus serves as a broader measure of potential youth labour market entrants than youth unemployment. It includes discouraged worker youth as well as those who are outside the labour force due to disability and engagement in household chores, among other reasons. NEET is also a better measure of the current universe of potential youth labour market entrants as compared with the youth inactivity rate, as the latter includes those youth who are outside the labour force and are in education, and thus are furthering their skills and qualifications.

Limitations: The calculation of this indicator requires to have reliable information on both the labour market status and the participation in education or training of young persons. The quality of such information is heavily dependent on the questionnaire design, the sample size and design and the accuracy of respondents’ answers. In terms of the analysis of the indicator, in order to avoid misinterpreting it, it is important to bear in mind that it is composed of two different sub-groups (unemployed youth not in education or training and youth outside the labour force not in education or training). The prevalence and composition of each subgroup would have policy implications, and thus, should also be considered when analyzing the NEET rate.

Source: United Nations Statistical Division

Data Source: Data for this indicator was primarily collected from the United Nations Statistics Division’s Open SDG Data Hub. National level data is provided to the United Nations Statistics Division by the respective nation, unless otherwise noted. To learn more about the data used in this portal, visit the about page.

Data is accurate as of October 31, 2018.

8.6.1 Youth not in Education, Employment or Training (NEET)

 
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8.6.1 Youth not in Education, Employment or Training (NEET) Sustainable Development Goals

8. Promote inclusive and sustainable economic growth, employment and decent work for all
8. Promote inclusive and sustainable economic growth, employment and decent work for all

8. Promote inclusive and sustainable economic growth, employment and decent work for all

Roughly half the world’s population still lives on the equivalent of about US$2 a day. And in too many places, having a job doesn’t guarantee the ability to escape from poverty. This slow and uneven progress requires us to rethink and retool our economic and social policies aimed at eradicating poverty.

A continued lack of decent work opportunities, insufficient investments and under-consumption lead to an erosion of the basic social contract underlying democratic societies: that all must share in progress. . The creation of quality jobs will remain a major challenge for almost all economies well beyond 2015.

Sustainable economic growth will require societies to create the conditions that allow people to have quality jobs that stimulate the economy while not harming the environment. Job opportunities and decent working conditions are also required for the whole working age population.

Related 8.6.1 Youth not in Education, Employment or Training (NEET) Targets

8.6

By 2020, substantially reduce the proportion of youth not in employment, education or training