Description
Maps
SDGs
Select Year Range:

8.8.1 Fatal Occupational Injuries

Target 8.8: Protect labour rights and promote safe and secure working environments for all workers, including migrant workers, in particular women migrants, and those in precarious employment

Goal 8: Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all

Custodian Organization: International Labor Organization (ILO)

Tier Classification: Tier II

To facilitate the implementation of the global indicator framework, all indicators are classified by the IAEG-SDGs (Inter-Agency and Expert Group on Sustainable Development Goals Indicators) into three tiers on the basis of their level of methodological development and the availability of data at the global level, as follows:

Tier I: Indicator is conceptually clear, has an internationally established methodology and standards are available, and data are regularly produced by countries for at least 50 per cent of countries and of the population in every region where the indicator is relevant.

Tier II: Indicator is conceptually clear, has an internationally established methodology and standards are available, but data are not regularly produced by countries.

Tier III: No internationally established methodology or standards are yet available for the indicator, but methodology/standards are being (or will be) developed or tested.

Source: United Nations Statistical Division

Definition: The frequency rates of fatal and non-fatal occupational injuries provide information on the number of cases of fatal and non-fatal occupational injury per hours worked by the concerned population during the reference period. It is a measure of the risk of having a fatal or a non-fatal occupational injury based on the duration of exposure to adverse work-related factors.

The incidence rates of fatal and non-fatal occupational injuries provide information on the number of cases of fatal and non-fatal occupational injury per workers in the reference group during the reference period. It is a measure of the personal likelihood of the workers in the reference group of suffering from work-related injuries.

For the purposes of international reporting on the SDG indicators, incidence rates are used, even though the indicator title of 8.8.1 calls for the use of frequency rates, as common practices around the world and data availability favour incidence rates.

Concepts: Definitions of the main concepts presented below are derived from the Resolution concerning statistics of occupational injuries (resulting from occupational accidents), adopted by the 16th ICLS in 1998.

Occupational accident: an unexpected and unplanned occurrence, including acts of violence, arising out of or in connection with work which results in one or more workers incurring a personal injury, disease or death. Occupational accidents are to be considered travel, transport or road traffic accidents in which workers are injured and which arise out of or in the course of work; that is, while engaged in an economic activity, or at work, or carrying out the business of the employer.

Occupational injury: any personal injury, disease or death resulting from an occupational accident. An occupational injury is different from an occupational disease, which comes as a result of an exposure over a period of time to risk factors linked to the work activity. Diseases are included only in cases where the disease arose as a direct result of an accident. An occupational injury can be fatal or non-fatal (and non- fatal injuries could entail the loss of work days).

Fatal occupational injury: an occupational injury leading to death within one year of the day of the occupational accident.

Case of occupational injury: the case of one worker incurring one or more occupational injuries as a result of one occupational accident.

Workers in the reference group: workers in the reference group refer to the average number of workers in the particular group under consideration and who are covered by the source of the statistics on occupational injuries (for example, those of a specific sex or in a specific economic activity, occupation, region, age group, or any combination of these, or those covered by a particular insurance scheme, accident notification systems, or household or establishment survey).

Rationale: This indicator provides valuable information that could be used to formulate policies and programmes for the prevention of occupational injuries, diseases and deaths. It could also be used to monitor the implementation of these programmes and to signal particular areas of increasing risk such as a particular occupation, industry or location. Although the principal objective of this indicator is to provide information for prevention purposes, it may be used for a number of other purposes, such as to identify the occupations and economic activities with the highest risk of occupational injuries; to detect changes in the pattern and occurrence of occupational injuries, so as to monitor improvements in safety and reveal any new areas of risk; to inform employers, employers’ organizations, workers and workers’ organizations of the risks associated with their work and workplaces, so that they can take an active part in their own safety; to evaluate the effectiveness of preventive measures; to estimate the consequences of occupational injuries, particularly in terms of days lost or costs; and to provide a basis for policy-making aimed at encouraging employers, employers’ organizations, workers and workers’ organizations to introduce accident prevention measures.

Limitations: There may be problems of under reporting of occupational injuries, and proper systems should be put in place to ensure the best reporting and data quality. Under reporting is thought to be present in countries at all levels of development, but may be particularly problematic in some developing countries. Data users should be aware of this issue when analysing the data. Double-counting of cases of occupational injury may also happen in cases where data from several registries (records kept by different agencies, for example) are consolidated to have more comprehensive statistics.

Because data quality issues may be present, it may be more relevant to analyse indicator trends rather than levels. When measured over a period of time, the data can reveal progress or deterioration in occupational safety and health, and thus point to the effectiveness of prevention measures. This indicator is volatile and strong annual fluctuations may occur due to unexpected but significant accidents or national calamities. The underlying trend should therefore be analysed.

Source: United Nations Statistical Division

Data Source: Data for this indicator was primarily collected from the United Nations Statistics Division’s Open SDG Data Hub. National level data is provided to the United Nations Statistics Division by the respective nation, unless otherwise noted. To learn more about the data used in this portal, visit the about page.

Data is accurate as of October 31, 2018.

 
Loading

8.8.1 Fatal Occupational Injuries in the Sustainable Development Goals

Click on the SDG to reveal more information

8. Promote inclusive and sustainable economic growth, employment and decent work for all
8. Promote inclusive and sustainable economic growth, employment and decent work for all

8. Promote inclusive and sustainable economic growth, employment and decent work for all

Roughly half the world’s population still lives on the equivalent of about US$2 a day. And in too many places, having a job doesn’t guarantee the ability to escape from poverty. This slow and uneven progress requires us to rethink and retool our economic and social policies aimed at eradicating poverty.

A continued lack of decent work opportunities, insufficient investments and under-consumption lead to an erosion of the basic social contract underlying democratic societies: that all must share in progress. The creation of quality jobs will remain a major challenge for almost all economies well beyond 2015.

Sustainable economic growth will require societies to create the conditions that allow people to have quality jobs that stimulate the economy while not harming the environment. Job opportunities and decent working conditions are also required for the whole working age population.

Related 8.8.1 Fatal Occupational Injuries Targets

8.8

Protect labour rights and promote safe and secure working environments for all workers, including migrant workers, in particular women migrants, and those in precarious employment